Wednesday, November 27, 2013

Chanukah: You don't actually have to gain weight

Did you know you could shred any starchy vegetable to make latkes? It's a good thing my granma is nifter (actually I feel horrible writing that, but you know what I mean), because she would not know what to do with the colorful latkes that come out of kitchens nowadays. When I was growing up, if the latkes were any color other than brown, you obviously did something wrong. I'm not a fan of using potata or sweet potatoes, as they are known here for latkes. They end up too mushy. But zucchini and carrorts are great add-ins. The color of the zucchini always makes me feel like I'm eating something healthy, and not just fried in enough oil to light my menorah for the next 8 days.

3 cups shredded kishu'im (zucchini)
3 eggs
1 package of that stuff that's not quite sour cream but not cream cheese
2 heaping cups of flour of your choice
a few shakes of baking poweder
a few more shakes of baking soda
about 1/8 c. xanthan gum (for fluffiness)
1/3 c. olive oil (canola also works)
big handful of walnuts (optional)

Ok, I am going to be honest. This isn't going to taste like 'cake' - as you may have notices, there is abosolutely no sugar up in here. None. But you know what - it's only 150 calories per serving, 9 grams of fat, plus lots of protein, fiber, and vitamins (especially if you use a mixture of white flour and spelt like I did).

Giant baked latke (aka Chanukkah Quiche)
3 eggs
1 cup flour
2 large shredded carrots
1 large onion
2-3 kishu'im (zucchini)
seasoning

shred the veggies in a bowl together. Mix together eggs and seasoning and add to the mix. Then fold in flour. Use non-stick spray to coat the pan. Bake at 225C for an hour. I would have sauteed the onions a little first next time I make this to bring out the flavor a little more. Live and learn